Category Archives: Link

Get Custom Advice For Boosting Your Conversions With Unbounce’s New Landing Page Analyzer

Introducing: The Landing Page Grader, by Unbounce

As a savvy marketer, it’s our sincere hope you never start a campaign without a dedicated landing page for sending your paid traffic to. But — as you know — the job isn’t over once a landing page is created.

Your real opportunity is in understanding how your page performs.

Beyond tracking standard performance measures like conversions and landing page quality (LPQ), you’ve likely wondered about other factors like:

  • Is my landing page copy clear? Are there too many words? Too few?
  • Is my page faring well on mobile? Does it load fast enough?
  • Is this page just designed nicely, or is it also optimized for SEO?
  • Is this a good conversion rate for this type of page in my industry?

Ultimately you want to know whether you’ve got an especially high converting page, or if there’s anything specific you can improve. But it can be difficult to know what ‘good’ looks like, and you may not always have a second set of eyes to help you critique.

New: Try Unbounce’s Landing Page Analyzer

For years we’ve seen the need for a landing page audit tool or landing page grader of some sort, and so—after many months of development—we’re very pleased to unveil the Unbounce Landing Page Analyzer.

With this grader-style tool, you input your landing page URL (along with a few key details) and The Analyzer instantly delivers a comprehensive, personalized report with custom recommendations you can try today to increase your conversion rates.

Unlike other landing page reviews, The Analyzer is truly a deep dive into your performance.

Not only do you get a summary of how your page compares to others in your industry, but you also see important page performance insights including your landing page’s speed, load time, and page requests that may be slowing things down.

If The Analyzer discovers your images are too large (contributing to slow load time), your custom report will include compressed versions of all your images to replace quickly and get your page loading even faster.

Not your average landing page grader: The Analyzer compresses images for you

Pictured: you’ll get custom, compressed images as part of your page analysis.

In The Analyzer’s comprehensive report, you’ll see specifics across nine categories, and discover whether your landing page:

  • Conveys trust and security
  • Appears properly on social networks and mobile
  • Is designed in a way that’s especially high converting
  • Contains too many calls to action
  • Has an appropriate Flesch reading ease and sentiment for your industry,
  • and much, much more.

Looking for a landing page checker?

Evaluate your landing page to reveal real, data-backed insights in minutes.

Wait, aren’t there other landing page graders out there?

Touche! There are other landing page analyzers/graders/calculators available, but we can confidently say Unbounce’s is the most sophisticated and comprehensive you’ll find. Ours is the only landing page analyzer on the market leveraging AI technology, and the endless amount of campaign research done by our customers and our in-house marketing team.

For the past eight years, we’ve been obsessed with the question “what’s a good conversion rate?”, and Unbounce’s internal research team has employed proprietary AI technology to analyze the behavior of over 75 million visitors to 65,000 landing pages with a goal of understanding what makes a customer convert.

We have more data than any other conversion platform to provide insights on what a high-performing landing page looks like, and The Analyzer leverages this insight.

Need a landing page checker? Check out the Landing Page Analyzer

The Analyzer’s data is sourced from Google Page Speed Insights, and our very own proprietary data broken down by industry.

Actionable feedback you can implement today

The best thing about this landing page review? You’ll discover instant improvements that might take you only minutes to fix.

The Wizard of Moz himself, Rand Fishkin ran the following product’s landing page from Moz.com through The Analyzer and had some great things to discover.

Rand wanted to run this page through for a landing page review

How’d this Moz page fare? Here are Rand’s initial thoughts:

“I’m glad to see we passed so many of the technical checks! I was a little nervous. [I] Realized that the page is missing testimonials or social proof. That’s a head-smacking moment.”

Rand may be a bit self-depreciating here, however. Moz’s page scored really well with a 75% overall:
The landing page grade for moz's page

Rand’s overall landing page grade.

Rand’s verdict on trying out The analyzer?

Rand Fishkin

“I’ve never seen a page analysis tool that’s focused on optimization. In my opinion, this can be hugely helpful for folks to quickly check that they’ve nailed the basics of landing page optimization and accessibility. I have no doubt tens of thousands of websites can get better just by applying this tool’s advice.”

What did we learn?

Interested in what The Analyzer could teach us about our in-house landing pages at Unbounce, we ran our recent event landing page for PPC Week through to see what we’d take away:

PPC week landing page

Pictured: The landing page for PPC week we input into the Landing Page Analyzer.

We learned the page converts very well for our industry (7.7%), and while the page loads pretty quickly (0.7 seconds), at 3.32MB it’s overweight and could be loading even quicker if we reduce it to less than 3MB:
our landing page evaluation for PPC week

Our PPC Week page’s overall grade. Note our message match and page speed could use some work.

What The Analyzer told us regarding page speed

Our PPC Week landing page is running a little slowly.

Fortunately, The Analyzer also provided us with some compressed images that will help us load up to 9% faster:

Some PPC week images we can replace

We also saw that our page title, meta description and H1 tags were helping our SEO visibility (which was important for this particular page).

All of these quick-to-change factors can improve this PPC Week page for us, but we’re most excited to see what you’ll discover about your own landing pages. Bonus, you don’t need an Unbounce-built page to try The Analyzer, either. Give it a try today and let us know what you think!


Unbounce

How Just One Ecommerce Popup Offer Helped Canvas Factory Generate 1.1 Million in Revenue

Canvas Factory's Popup Success

When you hear ‘website popup’ in a marketing context, my bet is—as a discerning marketer—you all but cringe. Surely these boxes that jump up in the middle of a screen are for low-level marketers. They’re scammy, make you lose your train of thought, nobody likes them,…you’d never use ‘em.

But can you really hate popups if they’re found to drive results?

As heated as the debate can get, Richard Lazazzera, an ecommerce entrepreneur and Content Strategist at Shopify has a fair point in this reply to a comment on his blog post:

Image via the Shopify blog.

And drive sales they can.

By experimenting with popup overlays, Sydney-based Canvas Factory (an ecommerce shop providing high-quality canvas prints) has found a ton of success engaging prospects at exactly the right time.

Using just one popup that appears across several of their domains, Canvas Factory discovered the targeting that worked best for them, and—most importantly—brought in 1.1 million USD in revenue(!) via their offer.

In today’s post, we’ll share Canvas Factory’s story, along with some lessons learned, so that—if you’re tempted—you too can convert more site visitors.

Canvas Factory’s approach to ecommerce popups

Similar to many ecommerce brands, Canvas Factory wanted to convert more of the visitors leaving their site empty handed. They’d realized some prospects only needed a moderate incentive to get over any purchase anxiety, so they had started offering a small discount via a coupon.

Eventually they wondered if the coupon would perform even better if delivered via a popup at the right moment.

Experimenting, they created this popup overlay in Unbounce for their site:

One of Canvas Factory’s domains outfitted with their popup.

They duplicated this one design eight times for running across different domains on certain URLs. The copy was the same for each, offering $ 10 off someone’s first order in exchange for an email, and only appeared as someone was actively trying to leave the site, once per visitor.

The main difference was location. The brand ran four of these overlays across their product pages on their Australian and New Zealand domains, while another four appeared on the Canvas Factory blog across the same domains.

How’d the experiment go?

The Unbounce popup overlay has now been running from November 2016 to present and in comparing the period before using the popups to promote this same coupon code to now:

  • Canvas Factory has seen a 6% to 9% increase in use of the coupon, and
  • Subscription to their mailing list has grown by over 14.3%.

Now the brand’s marketers can do a better job actively nurturing prospects claiming the coupon, and re-marketing to successful first-time customers.

But in terms of the bottom line? Managing Director Tim Daley says it best:
Tim from Canvas Factory

“Unbounce played a key part in Canvas Factory’s conversion rate optimization activity for our subscriber campaign. This has contributed to over $ 1.1 million dollars in purchases.”

$ 1.1 million the brand may not have otherwise seen had they not tried the overlay? If that’s not making you reconsider whether or not your personal distaste for popups should stop you from trying one out, I’m not sure what will.

That said…

How’d the brand track success?

Tim tells us the coupon use was measured by integrating Unbounce popup overlays with their mail platform and their payment gateway CS-Cart:

“This [integration] allows us, per country level, to collect new subscribers, partition [them] to relevant country and then track their individual and group purchase application of the coupon acquired through the popup.”

Ultimately the integration lets Canvas Factory see:

  • How many customers are using coupons + how many discounts are being used total
  • Total revenue before and after coupons are applied
  • Average order value before and after coupons are applied
  • What kind of customers the brand’s attracting with coupons

All very useful factors in understanding how long a campaign like this is feasible for, and experimenting with different discounts.

Want to push your lead data collected via landing pages, sticky bars, and popup overlays through to your mail platforms and other tools? See our Integrations Powered by Zapier and all the connections available right in Unbounce.

It’s all about location: A lesson on why popups in the wrong place are a big mistake

Your gut feeling that popups can be scammy? It’s not far off. If used incorrectly at the wrong time or on the wrong URL of your site, they certainly can be. We’ve all seen these types of popups and they’re maddening.

In Canvas Factory’s case, it wasn’t as simple as create the popup, set it and forget it. In running their Unbounce popup overlay in several locations, they’ve learned placement and timing is critical.

In Tim’s case, he discovered that the blog wasn’t the proper placement for this particular offer, it was simply too soon in the buyer journey to be offering someone a discount. With posts on the brand’s blog aimed to help you take better photos of your kids and other photography tips, this level of awareness doesn’t really align with wanting to purchase right away.

Overall, Canvas Factory’s blog popup conversion rate was 0.18% versus the up to 11% conversion rate they’d seen on product pages where the purchase intent was likely higher.

As outlined above, aim to align your offers with buyer intent.

The lesson:

If you choose the right place for your offer (pricing pages and high commitment URLs in Canvas Factory’s case), you’ll see results because you offered a timely and relevant incentive. In the wrong place, however, you simply won’t see the results you want, and worse, you’ll irritate and annoy your visitors.

Get actionable tips on where to place your popups, and which types of messages perform best in our Best Practice Guide.

So you shouldn’t use popups on your blog?

No—Canvas Factory’s unique experience isn’t to say that popups on your blog won’t work, because they definitely can. You just have to choose the right kind of offer and perfect targeting. Because your blog readers may not be product aware yet, you need to align your offer with the level of awareness readers do have about your company (i.e. they might be open to a free in-depth ebook about the exact topic they’re already reading about).

You might also try directing your blog traffic to an even higher-converting area of your site.

Here’s a super relevant clickthrough popup Seer’s Wil Reynolds uses to offer up more relevant content on his site:

By proactively serving up what prospects might want next, Seer becomes more trustworthy and keeps people engaged on their site longer (which is a great sign in Google’s eyes). You can make traffic shaping like this the goal of some of your popups in locations where a higher-commitment ask doesn’t make sense.

Try an Experiment Yourself

Overall, popups can definitely be annoying when used aggressively or poorly (there’s no arguing that) but, as we’ve seen with Canvas Factory, proper targeting and relevant offers can make all the difference to both marketers and site visitors who can be receptive to proper incentives at the right time.

If you’ve got a great campaign or offer running, a well-timed and targeted popup could ensure all the right people see it and that you don’t leave opportunities on the table.

Try an Ecommerce popup from Unbounce today


Unbounce

Don’t Settle. Build the Marketing Campaigns of Your Dreams Without a Line of Code

Conquer technical limitations with Zapier and Unbounce

Hi, I’m Corey. Are you an idealistic marketer, like me?

That is—do you plan your marketing campaigns by pretending technical limitations aren’t a thing and just map out the ideal experience you want for your prospects from first impression to final conversion? Like this:

A photo of my actual campaign flow on the whiteboard.

If your whiteboard looks this optimistic, read on. We’ll nerd out together.

After us idealistic marketers are done dreaming about our perfect campaign structure from start to finish, the harsh reality sets in: technical limitations are definitely a thing. When the time comes to figure out how to actually do something a little crazy, like augment lead data or enrich it with extra data pulled from ‘the internet’, things get much trickier. But if you’re dedicated to the campaign you mapped out, you really want to make it happen.

Often, you’ll ask a developer for help and hear, “Sure it’s possible. I’ll just need two weeks to code it up. Log a request and we’ll prioritize it against all the other requests for my genius.”

We both know you’re not logging that request, because it’s not getting prioritized.

Eventually, you run a campaign that looks exactly like what you’ve done before, or what everyone else is doing, because it’s relatively easy for us—lowly marketers—to pull off by ourselves.

It’s infuriating.

Can’t we Execute More Sophisticated Marketing?

Is it too much to ask that we can create whatever the hell we dream up, so we can push the industry forward? To deliver the experience we think could make a difference to our prospects—one they might even enjoy?

Not if we need to rely on devs to help build our lead management or the integrations component of our campaigns for us, unfortunately.

However, I’ve found that more and more often I don’t need to have these futile conversations with developers. Modern martech has brought us tools to help, and the tool that comes up most often for me is Zapier.

Your Marketing on Zapier

Have you ever punched above your weight at work and solved a problem that that you’re totally unqualified to solve? It. feels. so. satisfying. You feel way smarter than you actually are.

I got that feeling when I used Zapier with Unbounce for the first time. I still get that feeling today. If you dream big enough, and can connect the right tools together, you can pull off campaign workflows that feel almost impossible.

Exactly how I felt having used Zapier for the first time.

Most recently, I tried to execute the campaign in the whiteboard photo above (the one above the Dragonball Z meme). The campaign—called Conversion Quest—challenges PPC marketers working in agencies to double the conversion rate of one of their client’s landing pages in 30 days.

When planning this campaign, I wanted to have a prospect fill out the form on a landing page with the current date (when they were “starting their quest”), and their current conversion rate. From there, they’d receive an email confirming their personalized quest goal and deadline by which they’d ideally complete the challenge (The email was to automatically pull in someone’s target conversion rate and their custom due date a month out).

Of course, when I’d planned this flow, there was no technical way to magically include a doubled conversion rate and custom due date directly in each prospect’s followup message. That is until my colleague reminded me of Zapier Formatter, which allows you to manipulate your lead data before it goes into your marketing automation platform (or CRM, or Email Marketing Service, or wherever other tool you can think of). Just 30 minutes later (and without approaching our dev team), I had augmented data going into our marketing automation platform.

Now Conversion Quest runs with custom info in the followup, all thanks to a quick Zap (a preconfigured integration template connecting two or more apps).

Here’s an example of the message I send in that campaign:

Here’s a sample of the email I manipulated data with via Zapier to personalize.

Now, are you going to need to use Zapier so you can build Conversion Quest?

No (that’s my great idea)… But my bet is you’ve got amazing campaign ideas for which Zaps could help you create a consistent (better!) experience for your leads, and help you stop relying on developers. As a bonus, Unbounce now has Integrations Powered by Zapier available right in the builder, so you can do this super quickly, without ever leaving Unbounce.

Here’s just a sampling of the Zaps available right in Unbounce. There are 60+ right in app, and with a Premium Zapier account you can access over 900!

Let’s dig into the versatility for a second.

Leveling up your marketing (without a line of code)

You could use Unbounce’s Integrations Powered by Zapier if…

1. You need to connect a client’s hodgepodge of tools

In this case, you’re a marketing agency that needs to build high-converting lead gen landing pages, overlays or sticky bars that connect to anything and everything your clients use, which could include:

  • Hatchbuck
  • Base
  • Follow Up Boss
  • Agile CRM
  • Pipedrive
  • Salesforce
  • HubSpot CRM
  • Capsule CRM
  • PipelineDeals

A few quick Zaps can connect your lead data to all of the above.

2. You want to use an existing CRM or marketing automation platform, with custom landing pages/Unbounce

If you’re using a tool that requires you to use rigid forms or landing pages, but you’d rather have custom landing pages that look great, convert like crazy and give you more control over the experience, you’d simply Zap together your landing page builder with tools/platforms like:

  • GoToWebinar
  • Marketo
  • Salesforce
  • Pardot
  • MailChimp
3. Your CMS or Marketing Automation tool doesn’t enrich your data for you

With Integrations Powered by Zapier, if you collect a lead in Unbounce, Zapier can enrich the lead’s profile with extra data (using, for example, the lead scoring Zap) en route to wherever you’re storing your leads.

4. Your sales team would like to be notified immediately when a super qualified lead comes in…but they never check their email

For this, you can try sending notifications via the following Zaps:

  • SMS integration
  • Slack
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
5. You’d like to route leads to specific salespeople in your CRM depending on the info a prospect submits in a form

Joe Savich from Altos gave this a try in Unbounce, and had high praise for this email parser Zap:

“It’s pretty nice. The integration powered by Zapier was super easy to setup…I was able to create a lead notification with a condition that, depending on which custom field was chosen, would send that lead to the appropriate sales team. My client thinks I am a magician! I could see this being used a lot going forward.”

Overall, of all the feature releases in my 4 ½ years at Unbounce, Integrations Powered by Zapier is my all time favourite. Zaps from right inside our builder empower marketers to do things you shouldn’t be able to do, without developers. And they make you feel really smart.

If you’re committed to driving our industry forward with some next-level marketing (that may look impossible at first glance), I’d urge you to try zapping some connections together and getting creative. You might surprise yourself, or better yet your boss or clients.


Unbounce

Improve Your Quality Score From Ad to Landing Page: A Former-Googler Tells All

An ex-Googler gives an inside look at how AdWords Quality Score works. Image via Shutterstock.

As an Unbounce blog reader, you already know conversion rate optimization is a great way to drive more results from the money you’re already spending to acquire traffic to your site. So today I’d like to focus on another way to make more money from your marketing efforts; namely, ad optimization.

After a decade of building AdWords at Google, I cofounded Optmyzr because I found it was too time consuming to run best practice optimizations. And — considering that last year over $ 35 billion was spent advertising on Google (more than twice what was spent on Facebook) — there is tremendous value in making AdWords perform even a little bit better.

While there are many ways to improve your ad performance, one of the most pertinent is to improve your Quality Score (QS), particularly the subcomponent, landing page quality (LPQ).

But before I get into how to improve your Quality Score via landing pages, here’s some behind-the-scenes context based on my time at Google.

What is Google Quality Score?

One of the teams I worked on for seven years while at Google was the Quality Score team so I’ve written extensively on the topic. For a primer, here are some of my favorites:

  • Quality Score Explained by a Former Googler
  • Quality Score: All You Need to Know
  • Calculating Quality Scores (Video)

Ultimately, Quality Score is Google’s way of using collective wisdom of many searchers to measure the relevance of a keyword. In short, it’s a measure of how good of a job you’re doing providing people with search queries with strong answers.

This is important because if you are the best answer to someone’s query with your ad and resulting landing page, Google gives you your clicks for less money because you’re helping provide a better user experience, which makes Google more money.

Quality Score impacts ad rank and costs

It’s fairly well known that Quality Score is one of the factors that determines Ad Rank. The other factors are the bid and the impact of ad extensions.

When you improve any of these three components, your Ad Rank increases, which leads to one of two possible outcomes:

  1. You win a better ad position (but pay the same or more for improved placement on the page), or
  2. The position of your ad remains the same, but you get a discount and pay less for any clicks you get.

In short: You can get a discount on AdWords by making your ads (and corresponding landing pages) more relevant!

This is because the CPC you pay is only part of what determines how Google makes more money.

Ad Rank now vs. then

To deepen your understanding of AdWords, I find it useful to take a quick trip down memory lane about the ad auction. Ad Rank used to be calculated like this:

Ad Rank (circa 2002) = Max CPC * CTR

Notice that Ad Rank is actually Cost Per Mille (CPM or cost per thousand impressions) in this equation! Over time, Google started to use a predicted rather than historical CTR, so we changed how we explained the formula and introduced the concept of Quality Score so we could stop talking about pCTR (predicted CTR).

Ad Rank = Max CPC * pCTR Ad Rank = Max CPC * QS

Then we refined the algorithm to deal with some weird edge cases and rather than just multiplying the factors, the formula became more advanced. We communicated it as follows:

Ad Rank (today) = function (Bid, QS, Extensions)

With this historical context, we see that the ad auction is basically a CPM auction where the way the CPM is calculated has evolved over time.

So even though advertisers place CPC bids, Google is awarding the best ad positions to advertisers who deliver the best CPM for Google (aka: those who provide more relevant ads that get the most clicks).

How Quality Score can reduce CPCs

As an example to show how this discounting of CPCs really works, let’s say there are two advertisers, Julie and Robert and they both bid a max CPC of $ 1. However they have different Quality Scores, a 5 and a 10.

Bid QS Ad Rank CPC
Robert $ 1 10 10 $ 0.51
Julie $ 1 5 5 $ 1 (or the auction minimum)

As you can see, Robert (who’s winning the auction) actually pays a lower CPC than Julie, because his Quality Score is better.

Effective CPC = Ad Rank of the ad to beat / this ad’s QS + the smallest monetary increment
Effective CPC for Robert = 5 / 10 + $ 0.01 = $ 0.51

This classic example oversimplifies the calculation of the CPC, however. For the example to be correct, we’d have to say that Robert’s CTR is twice that of Julie, and not just that his Quality Score number is twice that of Julie’s.

That’s because the visible QS number (between 1 and 10) is based on a non-linear assignment of a visible number to an underlying prediction of relevance.

To calculate the rank and CPC, Google uses a real-time prediction of CTR based on as many as hundreds of factors.

Real time Quality Score vs visible Quality Score

The Quality Score number between 1 and 10 that you see next to each keyword is simply an indicator and can be used to help prioritize what to optimize. After optimizations, it can be used to determine if improving relevance was achieved.

However, this number is NOT what is used in the Ad Rank formula.

Some indicators have more precision than others and there are also indicators that are linear and some that are not (the visible QS indicator is not necessarily linear).

The speedometer in a car and the signal strength bars on your cell phone are both linear, but the former is more precise than the latter. As you drive faster, your speedometer goes up precisely to tell you that you’ve increased speed. The bars on your cell phone, however, may take a while to go from one bar to two bars even though the signal strength has been gradually increasing for a while. Visible Quality Score is more like the phone’s signal strength indicator, except that there are 10 levels.

Articles claiming you can reduce your cost by 50% by doubling your QS number are oversimplifying, but they still make a valid point: that better Quality Score will lead to lower costs (assuming no jump in position).

The only way to reduce your CPC by half is by doubling your predicted CTR.

What factors go into Quality Score?

As an AdWords marketer, you want to get yourself a better Quality Score and a lower cost per click. There are several factors that go into Quality Score so let’s take a look at what those are:

  • Ad relevance
  • Expected CTR
  • Landing page experience

Ad relevance

Ad relevance is an indicator of how well your ad text matches your keywords.

It’s usually a good idea to include the core concept of the keyword in your ad text, and to also include some compelling unique value propositions that will make your ad stand out from competitors. Over the years I’ve personally noticed that even minor changes in word choice can have drastic impacts on how well the user understands the ad.

For example, when eBay changed their ads to say, “buy it on eBay” instead of, “find it on eBay.” Because the word “buy” implies ecommerce, this got a far better CTR than the word ‘find’ which didn’t directly suggest one could buy the desired item.

Expected CTR

Expected CTR is an indicator of how likely your ad is to be clicked.

At the most basic level, this requires choosing good, relevant keywords, and grouping them in logical ad groups so that you can write compelling ads that get users to click.

Landing page relevance

Landing page relevance indicates how well your landing page meets the needs of users, and there are many ways you can go about improving this.

As an example, Joe Khoei from PPC agency SalesX (where I serve on the board) says that using Dynamic Text Replacement on Unbounce landing pages for the Children’s Learning Adventure helped his client increase conversion rates (calls and form fills) from 1.4% to 3.3% over 8 months.

Generally, using personalization features like DTR will correlate to better Landing Page Quality (LPQ) because users are getting what they want and that is what Google wants too: happy users who continue to engage with ads.

In this example of a landing page for a music school, the instrument type is swapped out depending on which ad is clicked.
Want to improve your relevance (and thereby Quality Score) with especially relevant landing pages to go with your ads? Try Dynamic Text Replacement on Unbounce landing pages. See a preview of how DTR works here.

There’s an interesting tug of war between motives of landing page optimization; an optimization for conversion rate could hurt Quality Score, and Quality Score optimization could decrease conversion rates.

The trick is to find that right balance, and ideally aim to optimize where both QS and CR improve. Fortunately, they’re not mutually exclusive outcomes.

How to better track your Quality Score improvements

Once you make optimizations to your ads or landing pages with the goal of improving Quality Score, you’ll need to track if the changes are working. In this stage it’s critical you don’t lose sight of the bigger picture, which is to grow your business.

No executive ever said their goal for the company was to improve their QS next quarter. So remember, it’s a useful gauge to see if you could lower costs, but it’s not a business KPI.

Up until fairly recently, the easiest way to track changes in QS required using an AdWords Script, or signing up for a tool like Optmyzr, but now the data is also available directly in AdWords.

Additionally, tools like Optmyzr still make it easier to get historical QS data.

Optmyzr’s Historical Quality Score tool

To get at the daily variations in AdWords, you have to do a few things:

  1. Use the old interface. The new one doesn’t include subcomponents yet.
  2. Look at the data with the segmentation for “day” turned on. Simply looking at the QS between two compared date ranges doesn’t get you the daily data because both fields will show the ending value.

To see how your QS has evolved based on changes to your landing pages, turn on the landing page component in the AdWords interface and then download the data with a daily segment.

You’ll end up with columns like this:

After exporting this data, you can use a simple spreadsheet formula that compares the current value to the historical one, e.g. =IF(A2=B2,1,0), so that the field will contain a 1 if the value has remained the same.

From there, filter these out and you’ll see only instances where the LPQ has changed. This will help you see where optimizations to your landing pages are positively affecting LPQ as a subfactor in Quality Score.

The purpose and importance of landing page quality

Landing page was the last component to be added to Quality Score and I was still on the team when we made this change. We had come to realize that it was too easy for advertisers to game the system by writing must-click ads, but then lead the user to a not so spectacular landing page, and in some cases even to a scammy site.

We had to start looking at what happened after the click, so we used both manual processes with the policy team and automated ones through the QS indicator to find sites that weren’t delivering a great experience.

What matters for landing page quality?

Here are some of the things Google cares about for landing pages:

  1. The page needs to deliver what the ad promises
  2. The user’s privacy and personal information must be protected
  3. The page should be transparent about its purpose
  4. The landing page should let users freely navigate the web
  5. The page should load quickly

Deliver what the ad promises

The first part should be the easiest to abide by. After all, if you want to drive conversions, you should be doing CRO and you should take users to landing pages that are relevant to what you offer in your ads.

Protect the user’s privacy

Privacy gets a little trickier.

What Google wants here is that you don’t share user’s information with third parties without their permission. So if you’re collecting leads and reselling these, you could be running into LPQ issues.

Be transparent about the page’s purpose

This also rolls into transparency.

If you’re a middleman, you need to be upfront about that. Affiliates who create thin landing pages and doorway pages are likely to run into LPQ issues because they usually add very little value and yet force the user to go through an extra step to get to where they wanted to go in the first place.

Allow users to freely navigate

Providing options is another tricky one for advertisers who deploy landing pages for their ads rather than taking the user to the most relevant page on their site. At issue here is that the user can do only do two things on most of these pages: instantly convert, or go away. Even a user who is interested in what you offer may not reach the comfort level needed to submit their info right away and if they can’t find more info by browsing the main site, their only real option is to go away and that is seen as a bad thing by Google.

While it can be a best practice to have a classic landing page perform only one goal and not include navigation or distractions, what I’m advocating for here is that you consider the allocation of your paid spend to a combo of the right, most relevant pages (whichever they may be).

That is – consider for each keyword or ad group which page on your site (or which landing page) may be best to serve up for a given situation. You may be pointing paid traffic to a landing page that is too high commitment for someone at the top of the funnel and this could hurt your Quality Score if someone’s only option is to convert or bounce. It’s a matter of their perceived readiness.

To ensure you’re not penalized this way, get strategic and point your paid traffic to highly relevant pages, either on your site, or build more valuable, relevant landing pages for each stage of the buying process to access via your ads. By having especially relevant landing pages that present the right offer at the right time, you should be able to avoid the issue of options as visitors will be served up the right option for them on their journey.

Again, if you have a great offer, and a decent site, the idea is that users should be able to get all their questions answered before being asked to turn over their details.

Landing page speed

And finally, the speed of your landing page is very important as a factor Google considers.

Just know Google is not actually that stringent and so long as your landing page is not an outlier in terms of slowness, you’ll be fine.

But you should still care tremendously about load times because as a 2017 study by Akamai found, a 100-millisecond delay in website load time can hurt conversion rates by 7 percent and a two-second delay in web page load time increase bounce rates by 103 percent.

Google’s Group Product Manager for AdWords, Jon Diorio, recently shared a stat from SOASTA that a 1 second delay in landing page load times can decrease retail conversion rates by 20%.

Pay close attention to signals about whether landing page visitors are satisfied

When I was at Google and I gave presentations at industry events about Quality Score, someone would always ask how we measured landing page quality. While I couldn’t answer that question directly then, and still can’t today, I recommend that you pay close attention to signals like bounce rates and time on site.

Google Analytics is a great way to track these signals which are fundamentally a measure of how satisfied users are with your landing pages.

If a user sees an ugly page, a page that takes too long to load, or one that seems off topic for what the ad promised, they will use the back button and try their luck at the next site.

Whether you’re using Unbounce or not, you are hopefully already paying close attention to these things. After all, this is part of CRO. If a user doesn’t stay long enough to consider your offer, they surely won’t have time to convert and your cost for the click to get them to your page will have been wasted.


Unbounce

Send Your Unbounce Lead Data to 60+ Apps Instantly with New Integrations Powered by Zapier

Introducing Integrations Powered by Zapier

These days the average marketer has been cited to use anywhere from 12 to a whopping 31 tools to build the campaigns of their dreams, but making sure all of these different apps or tools work together like a well-oiled machine is often where things get messy.

For example, you might generate leads via your landing pages, but — depending on your marketing stack and the connections you’ve set up — it’s not always easy to automatically pass, tag and strategically route form data you’ve collected into all the different tools you need to work in (i.e. you might be using Google Sheets for lead tracking, your CRM for sales follow-up, and your marketing automation platform for triggering especially relevant email campaigns).

Maintaining a simple workflow for your lead management is next to impossible if your tools don’t connect and talk to each other properly.

Luckily, all the tools you love can talk to each other

Today at Unbounce, we’re excited to introduce our new Integrations Powered by Zapier.

Now, you can instantly connect your landing page, overlay and sticky bar lead data to over 60+ apps without typing a line of code or ever leaving the Unbounce builder.

Integrations Powered by Zapier

What’s Zapier?

If you’re not already a super fan, Zapier’s the tool over one million people use to connect their favorite web apps together for less busywork and more impressive automation. It’s like the one integration to rule them all – or the tool that makes all the other tools hold hands and play nice.

We’ve seen thousands of Unbounce customers build landing pages, overlays and sticky bars, then set up custom integrations with Zapier to funnel lead data into their other favorite tools like Intercom, Go2Webinar, Autopilot and Salesforce, for example. Today that connection’s even easier.

New: Unbounce's Integrations Powered by Zapier

Goodbye busywork, hello automation

Acting as a handy lead gen concierge, the new Integrations Powered by Zapier help eliminate mundane setup tasks.

With pre-built Zap templates directly in Unbounce and the usual integration set-up tasks automated for you, Zapier helps you get centralized lead management for any campaign in just a few clicks.

Even better? Zapier is a trade secret for leveling up the sophistication of your marketing. Using Zaps to connect your lead generation data with other tools and automate more actions, you can set up elaborate campaigns without needing to build workarounds or “hacks,” or depend on dev resources to build your integrations for you.

The possibilities are endless, but here’s a taste of how a few of our customers are already using this feature to fuel impressive campaigns without relying on IT.

Zap inspiration #1: Enrich your lead data

It’s one thing to generate new leads, it’s another if they get routed to your sales team pronto with extra context (like a lead’s unique preferences) included.

Joe Savitch, SEM and Inbound marketer at digital agency Altos, recently launched a lead gen campaign with a real estate client and wanted leads’ properties of interest included in the info submitted via the form (without the lead having to select manually from a drop down). In knowing which properties leads were expressly interested in, the real estate client’s sales team could follow up with especially relevant outreach.

Not only was Joe able to identify each lead’s specific interest using a lightbox that passed a value from the button to the lead form, but with Unbounce’s new Integrations Powered by Zapier (the “Email Parser” Zap), Joe created a lead notification that routed leads to the appropriate sales team based on which custom field had been chosen:

And here’s an example of the lead notification his team receives:

A sample of the lead notification Joe has automatically sent to the sales team via the Zap. Properties of interest are noted here for the sales team.

Joe’s verdict?

The Integration Powered by Zapier was super easy to setup and execute… My client thinks I am a magician! I could see this being used a lot going forward.

Want to push your lead data to other tools seamlessly? Get more info on the new Integrations Powered by Zapier, and see more Zaps available to you here.

Zap inspiration #2: Get visibility into campaign ROI

Serving many small to medium sized clients, Stefano Apostolakos of digital agency Webistry notes that many of the brands they work with don’t have, or aren’t familiar with sales CRM tools, meaning the agency can have a hard time demonstrating the ROI of the lead gen campaigns they run.

But now, thanks to the PipeDrive Zap directly in Unbounce, all of Webistry’s campaign leads get pushed into PipeDrive (a sales CRM), tagged and positioned appropriately in a client’s sales funnel.

Stefano’s team then runs monthly reports to discover which campaigns, ad groups and keywords achieve the highest CPA (cost per acquisition) to show the client just how valuable the new campaigns have been. Here’s what Stefano had to say about it:

Our customers have been very excited to see the direct impact their campaigns have on the bottom line. Being able to prove the value we bring has helped us to build loyalty, and generate an extensive portfolio of happy, long-term customers.

Want to set up a Zap to better see your ROI? To use Integrations Powered by Zapier, you’ll need a Zapier account and Unbounce. Learn more here.

Go forth and Zap!

This is really just the tip of the iceberg. While Unbounce now contains 60+ Zap templates to choose from right in the builder to get you started, if you have a Premium Zapier subscription, you’ll have access to over 900+ app integrations via Zapier you can make use of in Unbounce.

Whether you want to use one Zap at a time, or go wild with a few at a time (i.e. lead data pushed into Google Sheets, Slack, LinkedIn and more…), today you can finally manage, tag, and re-route all the leads you collect with Unbounce (from right in Unbounce). The only limit is your imagination.

You’ll simplify your campaign workflows, and all of your tools will run smoothly together. Not to mention, you can run far more complex campaigns without the help of IT.

We’re psyched to be the first conversion platform to make Zapier integrations available directly in the builder, and we can’t wait to see what you Zap together.


Unbounce

Google Is Leaving You Clues to Help You Rank Higher – Know Where to Look

Image via Shutterstock.

Google is leaving you clues about how to become a better marketer — and you might not even be seeing them. 👀

The job of every marketer today, whether they work in PPC, SEO, CRO, or content, is to solve people’s problems. Google is taking note of companies that are doing it well, and companies that are leaving people disappointed.

Search engine optimization is changing

With the help of AI, machine learning and years of data, search engines are getting better at predicting what people want.

At the recent Call to Action Conference, Seer Interactive founder Wil Reynolds explained that as search engines become more concerned with solving people’s problems, the old SEO toolset is going to be thrown for a curve:

My bet is on people signals in the algorithm becoming how we’re going to see ourselves ranking better and better. Google’s algorithm is going in a direction of better understanding what people want.

In other words, the search race is no longer simply about keywords — it’s about being a trusted brand committed to solving people’s problems.

Find clues to solve prospects’ problems

The good news is there are a few places you can start looking to see what your customers want, so you can then deliver.

Here are two places Wil suggests any marketer can look to better solve their customers’ problems and start seeing better results.

Pssst. Go here to watch the full recording of Wil’s talk at the 2017 Call to Action Conference: Breaking the Silo Between CRO and SEO to Make BIG Wins.

Clue #1: Comparison search queries

When your future customers are in the evaluation stage of their journey, they’re likely comparing you with your competitors. They’re typing in things like “best,” “compare” and “reviews.”

These keywords indicate that they’re not necessarily sold on you yet — they’re looking for a comparison. Knowing this, how can you discover exactly what they want so you can serve it up for them?

Examine the top organic results

Looking at the top organic results will give you better insight into what people actually want to see.

In the example Wil provided of a search query for “best CRM software,” all of the top paid results are companies, while the top organic results are comparisons:

Results 1-4 are ads. The two below are organic results. Image via Wil’s CTAConf talk.

The discrepancy in the type of organic content that is being shown versus the type of content in the ads tells us the paid content isn’t directly solving the problem people are searching for.

This gives smart marketers a hint that when people use search terms like “best,” they aren’t ready to be sold to. Instead, they’re looking for content that directly compares vendors or brands and allows them to come to their own conclusion about what “best” really is.

Or as Wil put it:

When you want to rank on Google for something organically, they make you solve that person’s problem… but if you are willing to give them money, they’ll just let you show up for it all day long.

Now that you know what your customers are actually looking for, what’s next?

Create content that replicates those top organic results

The image below shows what one of the top organic results looked like for “best CRM software”:

Image via Wil’s CTAConf talk.

HubSpot took inspiration from this PCMag article and recreated their own table comparing their solution with a few of their competitors:

Image via Wil’s CTAConf talk.

By creating this comparison chart, they’re giving their potential customers the kind of content they’re looking for at this point in their buyer journey.

Notice that HubSpot actually ranked themselves second in the chart. What kind of marketer would say they’re second best? Bold!

We typically see marketers shouting, “We’re #1!” from the rooftops so consumers constantly feel like they’re be sold to. In this case, as Wil points out, HubSpot is taking a risk by not claiming to be #1. But they’re putting the needs of the customer first, which consumers are sure to love — and Google, too.


Answer customers’ questions instead of just shoving them into your funnel. Google will thank you.
Click To Tweet


Clue #2: “People Also Ask” box

Google’s “People Also Ask” box is a goldmine of information for anticipating what your customers will be searching for next.

The “People Also Ask” feature, introduced in 2015, is an expandable box of search queries related to the original search. Each question can be expanded by clicking on it, which gives the user options to refine their search or dig deeper on the subject:

“People Also Ask” boxes create an infinite source of related questions, in this case all about pizza.

This feature can tell smart marketers several things about how users are searching and creates an opportunity to solve their customer’s problems in more places.

How can you use this clue in your marketing?

Answer more of your users’ questions

Wil explained that when you’re looking for new content ideas, the “People Also Ask” box can be a never-ending source of inspiration.

Start by typing in common search queries for your industry and see what else comes up in the “People Also Ask” box. The suggestions in this box are based on high volume search queries, so they’re a healthy bet for your own content strategy.

The “People Also Ask” box also presents an opportunity to be the leader on any subject. Imagine if you had position 0, position 1, and the “People Also Ask” results? Every user would be led to your content.

Image from Wil’s CTAConf talk.

The results in the “People Also Ask” boxes are usually results that rank in the first page for that particular search term. To knock out your competitors from these positions, you’ll need to focus on creating high-quality, well-structured and informative content for each search query.

Create a better pop-up experience

Now we’re going to take it a step further beyond creating content on related searches and get into creating content that guides your customer through their journey.

In his talk, Wil explained that “People Also Ask” boxes are giving you cues about how your prospects’ brains work:

“People Also Ask”s are the clues to what people who just searched for [your thing] are going to ask next.

Because the related questions that come up in the “People Also Ask box” are things that other users actually clicked on, you can make assumptions about the kinds of things your customers want to know next.

For example, Seer found that after reading their SEMRush guide, many customers were also asking about comparing SEMRush to Moz.

Seer took this information and created a guide comparing the two tools. They then added a slide-in pop up to their SEMRush guide article, which you can see in the image below, presenting the reader with the option to read the comparison next.

Image via Wil’s CTAConf talk.

Now a reader doesn’t have to return to Google to find the information they wanted next, because Seer has already presented it to them.

By anticipating what their customers will ask for, Seer is able to keep readers on their site, answer more of their questions and become an even more trustworthy source.

Place ads on trusted sites

We’ve seen that the results in the “People Also Ask” boxes are typically high-quality, informative content that Google already ranks on page 1. This means these sites are highly trusted by Google and they’re showing up for these search queries, so there is a high chance that your customers will visit these websites at some point in their search.

This creates a new opportunity to target your customers with display ads on the sites that you anticipate they will be visiting.

To do this, Wil explained, dig into the “People Also Ask” results to find what sites are coming up as the top answers for all of the queries related to your keyword.

Once you have a list of sites, use Google’s Display planner tool to find those sites and get an idea of how many impressions you’ll get. Then create display ads on the sites that come up most.

Google likes problem solvers

As Google gets better and better at understanding what people want, marketers will need to take an approach that puts solving their customers problems first.

Luckily, Google is already starting to leave clues about what your customers really want to see from your company. 🔎

Using these suggestions to start taking action and showing up for your customers at every step of their journey will put you ahead of the curve.


Unbounce

Real Estate Landing Pages (Our Customer Favorites + Why We Think They’re Great)

Whether you’re an independent realtor or work at a real estate agency, you can gain a competitive advantage if you have owned digital properties to drive your paid and social traffic to.

Owned properties — like landing pages — provide you more control in real estate versus relying on popular listing sites where the journey isn’t always clear, you can’t customize your call to action or match your branding.

In short, real estate marketing can really benefit from lead capture landing pages because they allow you to:

  • Establish and grow your mailing list, ensuring you can follow up with and remarket to interested prospects later.
  • Showcase properties especially well, creating urgency and delivering especially compelling offers (like granting early access to listings, for example).
  • Track social and paid campaigns better. With a listing site you don’t have access to metrics and can’t determine ROI as quickly as you can with a landing page.

Ultimately, you can use landing pages to understand exactly who is interested in a property, entice prospects to book appointments (or other offers) and wow new clients with on-brand design.

In this post I’ll break down some of the best ways to start using real estate landing pages with a few examples from Unbounce customers.

1. Showcase your listings (and grow your mailing list)

At minimum, every real estate broker needs a place to share listings online. But ideally, you’ll want to own the experience.

RE/MAX agents Matthew Davidson and Kimbe MacMaster know this first-hand.

These independent agents use Unbounce landing pages to showcase an overview of a property: quick stats, a photo gallery, a video and details on the community. And while a property is available, prospects can book a showing as the call to action:

Featuring trendy parallax scroll, this page converts at 0.38%. Click to view full-length landing page.

Once the listing is sold (nice work Matthew and Kimbe!), the CTA changes to allow interested parties to sign up for early notice for similar listings in the future:

This post-sale CTA swap is a terrific way to build your email list for advertising similar properties in the future.

Having used the Unbounce Loft template, Matthew and Kimbe can simply duplicate this page each time they need a dedicated place to feature a listing. This allows the duo to be listing-specific when they link from a Facebook or search ad, ensuring a seamless ad-to-landing-page experience for potential buyers.

According to the Unbounce Conversion Benchmark Report, 41.6% of marketers in real estate have at least one page that converts under 1.3%, so Matthew and Kimbe’s conversion rate above is in line with what we see for many real estate marketers.

See how your conversion rates stack up in real estate (and nine other popular industries)

Download the Unbounce Conversion Benchmark Report to see how your landing page performance compares to your competitors.
By entering your email you’ll receive other resources to help you improve your conversion rates.

2. Entice buyers with exclusive pre-sale info, floor plans, price lists and more

Booking viewings of individual properties is great, but what if the real estate you’re selling is still in development?

Working with large and small-scale real estate developers, Rennie helps their developer clients plan and execute all aspects of their marketing and sales strategy, including online advertising. As part of their online strategy, they create project-specific landing pages and direct all paid traffic to those pages to gather leads.

Here’s an example created for The Pacific by Grosvenor:

This real estate landing page currently converts at 7.92%. Click to view full-length page.

Jennie Sebastian, Rennie’s Digital Marketing & CRM Manager, shared that the marketing team typically has a kick-off meeting five to six weeks before a campaign. Once they determine targeting and put together a media schedule, creative — including development of the landing page — can begin.

The campaigns typically employ search ads, display, Facebook, Instagram and WeChat, but the team is always looking for new ways to reach their target audiences.

As many real estate marketers can likely empathize with, Jennie shared:

One of the biggest challenges in online marketing is coming up with a strong call to action that entices users to provide us with their personal information.

Depending on the phase of the project and assets available, CTAs range from, “Sign up now for early access” and “Download all floorplans now,” to “Book a private appointment now.”

Through numerous A/B tests the Rennie team has found that more specific CTAs convert significantly better than more generic ones, as they clearly articulate to a prospect what they are receiving in exchange for their information.

Which brings us to landing page idea number three…

3. Get prospects to picture themselves in their dream home with a virtual tour

Just as Jennie from Rennie told us above, compelling CTAs are very important in real estate marketing, and offering a virtual tour has proven to be very effective for their team:

We recently offered a virtual tour using special 360 degree photography for one of our projects in Calgary. After updating the CTA to “Take a virtual tour now,” we saw a significant increase in the conversion rate.

Here’s an example page of theirs, which converts at 4.15%:

Click to view the full-length landing page.

Clicking the CTA button triggers a form gating the tour:

Even if you can’t wrangle 360 photography, you can still get prospects to picture themselves in their dream home.

Simple videos, photo galleries, or even the hero image on your landing page can do the trick. But be sure to test.

Example test of hero image variants

Here’s an example from Coronation Properties via digital agency Rocket. They test variations of their pages with different key elements of a property featured in the hero image.

Here’s a variant wherein the bedroom is the hero shot:

And another where the kitchen takes the spotlight:

The takeaway here?

Get creative with videos, 360 tours, or even experimenting with your hero shot, to give clients a glimpse into the property that’s right for them.

4. Offer up relevant listings to abandoning visitors

While landing pages clearly offer a competitive advantage in real estate, you also want to ensure you’ve optimized your website for conversions.

As our customers at Brixio know, you can try out an Unbounce overlay to ensure you’re not missing out on conversion opportunities. Overlays allow you to show relevant offers to specific users at the perfect time, making them less likely to leave your website without converting.

Unbounce Convertables

We love their idea for an overlay triggered to appear on exit to those leaving a website, tempting potential real estate buyers with off-market or exclusive listings.

Here’s a preview of what they had in mind:

With Unbounce, you can launch your overlay at any point during someone’s visit on your website: on exit, on arrival, after delay, on scroll and on click. Find out how Unbounce overlays work here.

5. Test a simple value prop to prompt more commitment-heavy offers

For marketers in the business of custom real estate, your offer of a tailor-made home is much more commitment-heavy than simply moving into an existing place.

This poses an interesting challenge: interested prospects likely have many questions, may be exploring many options and need a reason to trust you immediately.

Here’s agency Rocket’s solution: an on-brand, clear landing page (where prospects can “enquire today”):

This page converts at 1.84%. Click to view full-length landing page.

This small offer accompanied by all the fine details serves as a type of micro conversion, ensuring Manor Homes’ prospects have the chance to reach out and get the conversation started about a custom home.

Get creative with your own micro conversion incentives! For example, you may want to consider inviting prospects to download a collection of your custom homes to preview at their leisure.

6. Offer up relevant content marketing (so you can nurture leads later)

Plenty of businesses use content marketing to reach their target audience, and as Edina Realty knows, this applies to the real estate industry too.

As a subsidiary of Home Services of America, Edina Realty’s licensed pros guide customers through home buying and selling. To provide the most value to their clients, they deliver unique and useful content via custom landing pages.

Check out this Unbounce landing page they created to distribute their Ultimate Guide to Selling Your Home – it converts at a whopping 18%:

Click to view full-length landing page.

By combining content strategy with retargeting, Edina Realty is able to reach prospective leads throughout the funnel and deliver quality leads to their agents.

Hannah Kaeter, Digital Marketing Manager at Edina Realty, told us about the importance of educating leads:

One of the key challenges in our market is a low inventory of homes for sale at lower price points. With this challenge comes an opportunity to educate potential sellers — many of them first-time sellers — about the process so they can evaluate and make informed decisions about their own property and situation.

Ready to build your digital property?

Overall, the above examples illustrate the importance of having a dedicated place to send your paid and social traffic, which can make all the difference in whether you can track the ROI of your real estate marketing. This beats relying on common listing sites — especially in the case of condo developments or offers that require sophisticated branding or high commitment, like custom homes.

Replicate the success of these realtors with Unbounce’s real estate templates, and be sure to download our Conversion Benchmark Report for a breakdown of where you stand in this industry.


Unbounce

What It Really Takes to Get a 10/10 Facebook Ads Relevance Score

Image via Shutterstock.

If you want an ad campaign to be profitable, it’s crucial that your ad is shown to the right audience. Your ad promoting beard oil might have the best copy, images and offer — but it will never convert well if it’s shown primarily to a female audience.

The ad would be irrelevant, and you would receive a relevance score which reflects this.

It’s not enjoyable (or profitable) to run a campaign that doesn’t resonate with your audience. Fortunately, poor relevance is a problem you can solve.

Relevance is one of the most important yet under-discussed metrics for Facebook advertisers. This metric is calculated based on implicit and actual feedback that Facebook expects the ad to receive (both positive and negative). The score is updated as people comment on the ad, like it and click through to your landing page (or not).

The ideal relevance score is 10/10. Although this is not common, it’s certainly attainable, and you should always be striving to hit this target through split testing and optimizing.

To find your ad’s relevance score, navigate to Ads Manager on Facebook and add the Relevance Score tab to your ad report. Image source.

Achieving a high score decreases your cost per click (CPC) and ensures your ads are delivered to your target audience — ahead of competitors with a lower relevance score.

If you want to improve your relevance score, check out the following tips.

1. Get super specific with targeting to find your niche audience

Find the fanatics

In order to achieve that perfect 10/10, you need to be extremely specific with your ad targeting.

Every niche has casual fans and diehard fanatics — it’s important to get your message in front of the latter group if you want to run successful campaigns.

Why? Let’s say you’re manufacturing mixed martial arts apparel and want to target fans of the sport. A casual fan might tune in every time there is a gigantic fight night, whereas a fanatic watches every single event, has Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) posters on their wall and even has fighter bobbleheads next to their computer.

Put simply, fanatics are the type of people who won’t think twice about making an impulse buy if they see an ad which correlates with their passion.

Facebook’s Audience Insights is a great tool for gleaning insights about people based on individual pages they like.

Image source.

In particular, the Page Likes dashboard gives you a highly insightful affinity score for pages. This shows how likely fans of a particular page will be to like other pages compared to the average Facebook user.

Quick example

A lot of people follow superstar fighter star Conor McGregor, but that doesn’t mean they’ll buy your mixed martial arts t-shirt.

Audience Insights shows that fans of Conor McGregor like a range of loosely focussed pages, such as Joe Rogan, the UFC commentator and comedian, as well as Dana White, the CEO of the UFC.

Also, a bunch of irrelevant pages come up such as Fake SportsCenter and NFL Memes:

Load Audience Insights and click the Page Likes tab.

Now, compare this to fans of Jorge Masvidal — a fighter with minimal mainstream recognition, but who has a strong fan base of diehard mixed martial arts fans.

The 50 most relevant pages for Jorge Masvidal fans are all highly specific to the mixed martial arts niche. In fact, the vast majority are pages for other fighters — which is great if you’re trying to identify the pages that diehard fanatics follow (so you can use them in your targeting).

Load Audience Insights and click the Page Likes tab.

Since you can’t target every interest in Audience Insights when you run ads (some are unavailable, for some reason), it’s a good idea to create a document and record the most relevant pages within your niche. You can specify the pages that are available when you run a campaign of the most relevant pages.

As a general rule of thumb, I like pages that have an affinity score of 100x and above. An affinity score of 100x means that your seed audience is 100 times more likely to like this page than everyone else on Facebook.

Cub Swanson, another niche fighter with a diehard following, has an outrageously high affinity score of 726x for fans of Jorge Masvidal’s page. This is great information if you’re trying to find highly specific pages to target in this niche.

Finally, ensure that at least 80% of the pages in the Top Categories section are relevant to your niche, for every interest you input.

Jorge Masvidal’s page passes this test if you’re looking to market mixed martial arts apparel — even though there are a few erroneous pages (NFL Memes may not be the greatest market for your mixed martial arts apparel).

Load Audience Insights and click the Page Likes tab.

Age and gender

It’s a good idea to create a buyer persona for your business, which includes demographic info such as age and gender. Doing so can help you tailor your messaging accordingly.

Even if they like the same Facebook page, a 22-year-old man probably won’t respond to the same messaging or product as a 62-year-old woman. Show the same ad to these two demographics and get a different relevance score.

Some niches are heavily dominated by one gender, and this should impact the tone of your ads, your copy and most obviously, the products you’re marketing.

For instance, 46% of Facebook users are men, whereas only 17% of those who like pages in the vegan niche are men.

Load Audience Insights and click the Demographics tab.

Unless your product is very specific to one gender, I would recommend running ads for men and women.

By running ads at a low cost, you can get great insights about who is purchasing and who isn’t — which will let you run more relevant ads in the future.

For instance, the following ad promoted a cork necklace to women of all ages who like eco-friendly and vegan Facebook pages. Using the “Age” filter in Facebook Ads Manager, you can see that all but one of the purchasers was over the age of 45.

Ad data taken from a campaign by Vegan Horizon.

With this valuable insight, a subsequent ad campaign was run specifically to women aged 45 and up — with much better results.

Custom and Lookalike Audiences

If people have purchased from you multiple times, you know they’re someone who resonates with your brand. To achieve a great relevance score, consider running an ad to a custom audience of your previous customers.

Follow these steps:

  1. Export your customer list as an Excel spreadsheet (this is easy to do in Shopify).
  2. Go to “Audiences” in Ads Manager.
  1. Select “Custom Audience” from the “Create Audience” dropdown.

  1. Click “Customer File.”
  1. Upload your customer list.
  1. Once your new audience is ready (you may have to wait a few hours), run an ad campaign for this custom audience.
Pro tip: Word your ad as if you are speaking to an old friend, since this is an audience who has already bought from you. Customers who have already purchased from you should convert at a much higher rate than cold traffic.

Lookalike Audiences can be extremely profitable when they work, although they’re somewhat hit and miss in my experience. If you have a seed audience of several hundred customers within a country (ideally, several thousand), click the Create Audience tab and select Lookalike Audience.

Marketing to a good Lookalike Audience can definitely get you a perfect 10/10 relevance score.

2. Split test meticulously

While targeting is the most important part of achieving a high relevance score, the quality of your ad is significant too. For me, a quality ad needs compelling images, persuasive copy, a clear CTA and an offer that your target audience can’t resist.

Quality is, however, subjective. Fortunately, you can use split testing to determine what types of ads resonate with your audience — then refine your advertising to be more resonant in the future.

Sometimes, the ads I think are superbly written fail to convert, while others I think will underperform become huge successes.

Innovate based on the data rather than your assumptions, and you can’t lose.


Innovate based on data rather than assumptions and you can’t lose at split testing.
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Copy

When I first launch a campaign, I like to fire three ads at an audience, each with the same image but with different copy. I’ll aim to highlight different features and benefits in order to determine what resonates.

One ad might mention free shipping, while another focuses on the emotional benefits of the product and the last takes a controversial standpoint in order to create a polarized reaction (and hopefully, more engagement).

Check out this example of a split test by Forbes, featured in AdBeat. Forbes ran four different ads to promote their article listing the top 20 highest paid athletes in the world.

Forbes found that option A proved most successful. At the time of running this ad, Floyd Mayweather had been heavily featured in the news. It was also rumored that he took home a big pay check from his recent fight with Manny Pacquiao. Naturally, fans were curious to learn just how much Mayweather had made that year.

While you might want to test a conversational tone versus a formal tone, I find the most significant gains can be made by split testing the headline and CTA.

Using powerful, persuasive language works well in the headline, as does opening your copy with a personalized greeting depending on your niche.

For example: “Hey fisherman/lawyers/cat lovers!”

Also, don’t be afraid to test using negative words. Oftentimes, people are compelled to action through avoidance of pain rather than pursuit of pleasure — as this powerful ad shows:

Images

Once I’ve perfected my copy and have an ad which resonates well with my audience, I start split testing different images.

It’s important that your image looks professional. You can find plenty of free images on Pixabay, or you can give your product image to a freelancer on Fiverr to add some text and make it suitable for an ad.

Some marketers like to use red borders around their images to make them stand out. I think this looks a bit unprofessional, but again, it’s not my opinion that counts — it’s the people who see the ad and convert (or not) that matter.

Interestingly, Search Engine Land found that images of happy women, colorful logos and self portraits tend to convert the best. In my experience, pets and children also convert well, and situational photos often beat traditional product photography — but you must test and see what works best for your niche.

Check out this split test I performed to help a client determine which image to use for a campaign. Using the exact same copy, we let both ads run for three days.

The results were dramatically different.

The first ad received a CTR of 0.60% and zero purchases, whereas the second ad received a 2% CTR and three purchases over the three-day period.

Interestingly, the first ad had a relevance score of 7, whereas the second got a 9 — despite the fact both ads featured the same offer, the same copy and were targeted to the same audience.

3. Landing page optimization

While a great landing page won’t directly influence your relevance score, it is still important to get right.

By including credible social proof (such as video testimonials), persuasive copy, a powerful CTA and keeping your landing page stylistically consistent with your Facebook ad, your ad won’t just be relevant, it will be profitable — which is the goal, after all.

I’ve had positive results attracting B2B clients using Facebook ads. A free strategy session offered in my ads sends cold traffic directly to a case study page on my website.

Because I have a clearly defined buyer persona for my business, I ensure all my case studies are representative of this buyer. Because I target very specific interests and demographics on Facebook, I can ensure that the vast majority of people who click through from my ad will relate to the client in my case study.

By reading about the great results I was able to obtain for similar clients, new prospects are encouraged to get in touch for a free strategy session — where we can begin our relationship.

Through split testing, I’ve found that a bold “Contact Us” section at the end of a case study page works well as a CTA — especially when the colors contrast with the rest of the page (orange is one of the most popular CTA button color choices for a reason).

Get better results for less

Put simply, achieving a 10/10 relevance score will help you lower the cost of getting your message in front of the right buyers.

Because Facebook advertising is becoming more competitive, it’s essential to make your campaigns as cost effective as possible (that is, if you want to be profitable). When multiple ads are targeted to the same audience, a high relevance score will be factored in when Facebook decides which ad will be shown.

When split testing a campaign at a low daily ad spend, relevance should be one of the first things you look at when determining which ad has the highest likelihood of being profitable. In my experience, ads with a 10/10 relevance score usually scale better than those with a lower score.

Can you think of any other ways to improve your relevance score? Please let me know in the comments.


Unbounce

New to the Unbounce Builder: 10 Data-Backed, Industry-Specific Landing Page Templates

When Unbounce published our Conversion Benchmark Report, we wanted to empower marketers like us to take a more data-driven approach to optimizing their landing pages.

The report documents our findings after using machine learning to analyze the behavior of 74,551,421 visitors to 64,284 lead generation landing pages belonging to 10 of our most popular customer industries.

For each industry, the report summarizes average (and good and bad) conversion rates, and how certain variables — such as reading ease, page length and emotion — impact how likely a prospect is to convert.

A page from the Unbounce Conversion Benchmark Report.

Our hope was that these findings would help marketers make data-informed decisions when writing copy for their landing pages. But at Unbounce, we also like to eat our own dog food.

So when our design team was recently wireframing new landing page templates for the Unbounce builder, they looked to the report (and to commonalities between the 10 highest converting customer landing pages in each industry) to inform design decisions.

The result?

10 brand spankin’ new landing page templates for 10 of our most popular customer industries: Travel, Real Estate, Business Consulting, Business Services, Credit & Lending, Health, Higher Education, Home Improvement, Legal and Vocational Studies & Job Training.

Grab the report (which includes full benchmarks and copy recommendations for your industry) below, or keep reading for a sneak peek at five of our 10 new templates (check them all out here).

Download the Unbounce Conversion Benchmark Report (FREE)

Data-driven insights on average conversion rates per industry (+ expert copywriting advice)
By entering your email you expressly consent to receive other resources to help you improve your conversion rates.

Business Services: Harbor Template

The Unbounce Conversion Benchmark Report uses an Emotion Lexicon and Machine Learning to determine whether words associated with eight basic emotions (anger, anticipation, disgust, fear, joy, sadness, surprise and trust) affect overall conversion rates.

In the Business Services industry, Unbounce data scientists found that trust is an important emotion to convey. In fact, if more than 8% of your language implies trust, you could see some improvement in your conversion rates.

To complement trustworthy copy, Unbounce designers added a section to the Business Services Harbor Template to flaunt relevant trust seals and certifications, directly under the CTA. It also includes a pretty aesthetically pleasing optional video background:

And here’s one more data-backed copywriting tip for the road:

Be as concise as you can. Overall, Unbounce data scientists found that pages with fewer than 100 words convert 50% better than those with more than 500 words.

This chart from the Unbounce Conversion Benchmark Report shows how word count is related to conversion rates for the Business Services industry. On the x-axis we have word count — on the y-axis, conversion rate.
Get the Harbor Template (and a trial of Unbounce) here. Already a customer? Log in and get started with the template immediately.

Business Consulting: Marconato Consulting Template

You’ll notice the landing page template below that Unbounce designers created is quite short.

That’s because Unbounce data scientists found that every additional 250 words on a Business Consulting industry landing page correlates with 20% lower conversion rates.

This chart from the Unbounce Conversion Benchmark Report shows how word count is related to conversion rates for the Business Consulting industry. On the x-axis we have word count — on the y-axis, conversion rate.

You’ll notice that the template is a lead generation page offering an incentive such as an ebook. Our designers made this decision because they found that the top 10 highest converting Business Consulting landing pages they analyzed offered content instead of simply inviting visitors to “get in touch.”

One more thing to keep in mind when writing copy for this template?

Using any words that might evoke feelings of disgust in your audience (words like “blame,” “cheat,” “collapse,” “disaster,” and “offend”) could be hurting your conversion rates.

This chart from the Unbounce Conversion Benchmark Report shows how the percentage of copy that evokes disgust is related to conversion rates for the Business consulting industry. On the x-axis we have the percentage of copy that uses words related to disgust — on the y-axis, conversion rate.
Grab the Marconato Consulting Template here. Already a customer? Log in and get started with the template immediately.

Real Estate: ALLHËR Template

When Unbounce designers analyzed the 10 highest converting customer landing pages in the Real Estate industry, they found (unsurprisingly) that the pages were chock full of imagery: beautiful hero shots of the interior and exterior of properties, maps, full-width photography backgrounds and floor plans.

They took a cue from this when creating the visually striking ALLHËR Template:

And just because we like ya, here’s a bonus tip to keep in mind when you’re writing copy for your Real Estate landing page:

Unbounce data scientists saw a slight negative trend for pages in the Real Estate industry using more fear-inducing terms.

This chart from the Unbounce Conversion Benchmark Report shows how the percentage of copy that evokes fear is related to conversion rates for the Real Estate industry. On the x-axis we have the percentage of copy that uses words related to fear — on the y-axis, conversion rate.

If more than half a percent of your copy evokes feelings of fear, you could be hurting your conversion rates.

Here are some words commonly associated with fear on Real Estate lead capture landing pages: highest, fire, problem, watch, change, confidence, mortgage, eviction, cash, risk… (See the full list in the Unbounce Conversion Benchmark Report.)

Grab the ALLHËR Template here. Already a customer? Log in and get started with the template immediately.

Travel: Wayfaring Template

For the Travel Industry, Unbounce designers once again created a template that is quite visually striking, with a video background that transports you:

The emphasis on imagery in this template isn’t only a design choice; Unbounce data scientists found that in the Travel industry, landing pages with clear and concise language tend to perform best.

The large images complement the minimal copy boxes, which encourage you to explain what you are offering as simply as possible.

And here’s one final bonus copywriting tip, pulled straight from the Conversion Benchmark Report:

When writing copy for the Travel industry, keep language positive. If even just 1% of page copy subconsciously reminds your visitors of feelings of anger or fear, you could be seeing up to 25% lower conversion rates. No one wants to be angry on their vacation!

This chart from the Unbounce Conversion Benchmark Report shows how the percentage of copy that evokes anger is related to conversion rates for the Travel industry. On the x-axis we have the percentage of copy that uses words related to anger — on the y-axis, conversion rate.

Here’s a selection of commonly used words associated with anger in Travel, pulled from the Emotion Lexicon: limited, tree, money, hot, desert, endless, challenge, treat, fee, feeling, rail, stone, bear, buffet, lynch, bang, cash, cross, despair, shooting.

Grab the Wayfaring Template here. Already a customer? Log in and get started with the template immediately.

Higher Education: McGillis University Template

The Unbounce Conversion Benchmark Report indicates that for the Higher Education industry, the highest converting lead generation landing pages are short and sweet.

On average, pages using 125 words or less have 15% higher conversion rates. With this in mind, Unbounce designers created a short but punchy McGillis University Template for the Higher Education industry:

Bonus data-backed tip to help you fill this template with high-converting copy:

Higher Education is one of the few industries where targeting college educated reading levels has similar landing page conversion rates to copy targeting 7th graders.

This chart from the Unbounce Conversion Benchmark Report shows how reading ease is related to conversion rates for the Higher Education industry. On the x-axis we have the Flesch Reading Ease scale — on the y-axis, conversion rate.

At the end of the day, when you’re writing copy for your Higher University landing page, don’t stress about reading levels too much — if you are communicating complicated concepts to a highly educated audience, it’s okay to use big words.

Grab the McGillis University Template here. Already a customer? Log in and get started with the template immediately.

Let the data guide you

There you have it, five of the 10 data-backed templates that have just been launched in the Unbounce builder. Do you belong to an industry that wasn’t covered in this post? Check out all Unbounce templates here.

Once you’ve chosen the template you’d like to use to get started, read more data-backed copywriting tips for your industry in the Conversion Benchmark Report — and get a feel for what a “good” conversion rate is before you set that baby live!

Download the Unbounce Conversion Benchmark Report (FREE)

Data-driven insights on average conversion rates per industry (+ expert copywriting advice)
By entering your email you expressly consent to receive other resources to help you improve your conversion rates.


Unbounce

How to Improve Your PPC Reporting (And Your Landing Page Strategy, Too)

Image via Shutterstock/Red Deer.

Once upon a time, “Pay-Per-Click (PPC)” referred to a digital marketing practice where companies were charged each time somebody clicked on their search engine ads.

But with the rise of social, display and programmatic platforms, PPC marketing has expanded to involve more than search engines alone. These days, PPC specialists run paid campaigns across a variety of channels, and while the territory has changed, the reporting tactics haven’t.

Why your PPC reports aren’t awesome

You’re not alone if you find that the following things are holding you back from the advanced PPC reporting of your dreams.

1. The same words are used for different things

Most PPC specialists still end up pulling the same reports about the same quantitative metrics from Google Analytics. The problem is that different platforms (Facebook Audience Insights, Google AdWords Dimensions tab, Google Analytics, Bing Reporting) speak different languages.

Each platform’s PPC attribution models are different, their user data tracking is different, even some of their definitions are different.

Just look at how we measure “clicks.” On Adwords or Bing, a “click” means someone clicked from an ad through to your website. Meanwhile on Facebook, a “click” could mean clicking from an ad through to your Facebook page, your website, or just reacting to the ad itself.

Cbc GIFs - Find & Share on GIPHY

With different platforms and tools telling you different things, it’s pretty easy to make inaccurate conclusions about your PPC performance.

2. Your reports rely purely on baseline metrics

Tactics and terminology aside, these quantitative metrics don’t paint the full qualitative picture. Seeing that your click-through rates have increased doesn’t necessarily explain why.

If you saw that the cost of bread went down one day, you wouldn’t blindly assume that production of wheat got cheaper overnight. You would look into the expiry date, the shelf date and examine the product to try to understand the story behind the numbers.

So what do your metrics actually mean, and how can they help you drive more qualified traffic to your site? We’re here to help you generate insights from your PPC reports and show you how PPC performance can impact your landing page strategy.

How to Build PPC Reports that Actually Are Awesome

You want your PPC reports to provide takeaways that you can use to optimize your campaigns. There are a few measures you can take, together or on their own, to better understand your campaign performance.

Determine a baseline and track conversions by channel

Surprise, surprise! A conversion is one more metric that differs by channel. This is partly because each platform has a different attribution model, and partly because users have different intentions and behaviours per platform.

For example, cost-per-clicks (CPCs) tend to be cheaper on Bing because there is less competition and a higher conversion rate due to an older demographic:

bing keywords example

On the other hand, it’s easier to max out impression share and budget on Bing because there is less overall search volume compared to Google:

Google keyword example

Similarly, a user landing on your website through a non-branded keyword is less likely to convert than someone clicking through a branded keyword. It can be even harder to identify intent through social platforms, as users scrolling through feeds may come across your ad and engage out of interest but not be ready to convert.

Establishing platform-specific KPIs is an essential step to ensure you know what success looks like on every channel.

Qualify your visitors and monitor by segment

Given that each individual user’s intention varies by platform, it’s important to target your ads where they will be best received.

Instead of assuming every interaction is equal, use your platform insights to identify key audience groups and segment for target personas.

Monitor how your paid traffic fluctuates overall and by target audiences:

  • How do your audiences convert differently across various platforms?
  • How do you measure success differently between your branded and non-branded search campaigns?
  • How are you targeting different user segments through social campaigns?

A great way to identify whether you’re attracting relevant traffic is by keeping a close eye on your Search Query Report in AdWords and Bing. This report allows you to see exactly what people typed into the search engine when your ad appeared, so that you can adjust your keywords accordingly.

Track absolutely everything

Are you noticing an abnormal bounce rate or reduced number of sessions week over week through a specific source or medium? Setting up event tracking through Google Tag Manager can help you better understand on-site behavior and create custom metrics.

Your primary conversion may be an e-commerce purchase, but that doesn’t mean newsletter sign ups aren’t valuable. Tracking micro-conversions can give you a clearer idea of how people are engaging with your site and where there might be gaps in information.

At our Call to Action conference, Dana DiTomaso advocated for Google Data Studio as a great way to combine all your data into custom reports and dashboards.

If you’re doing cross-channel online advertising (which you no doubt are), it’s important to be able to see all your metrics visualized in one place. It makes it easier to draw analyses and gather insights to then share with colleagues or clients.

PPC Reporting + Landing Pages = Even More Awesome

Of course, it’s not enough to just put your conversions and KPIs into a beautiful report — it’s what you do with your PPC insights that matters.

Let’s say you spent years learning how to make smart investments. You met with stockbrokers, studied the market and opened a brokerage account. Would you expect money to just start rolling in? Of course not — because you actually have to invest to see results.

Similarly, in order to make the most of your PPC insights, you have to act on them.

Begin by applying insights from your PPC metrics into your landing pages. You want to customize your landing pages to meet the needs of your key audiences so you can give users exactly what they’re looking for.

To this end, Dynamic Text Replacement (DTR) can be used to sync up search queries to the landing page.

In this example of a landing page for a music school, the instrument type is swapped out depending on which ad is clicked.

Say a website sells furniture. If one user searches for “modern leather sofas” and another for “comfortable leather couches,” the ad copy for each result should reflect the search language.

The ads could then take users to the same landing page, but DTR would generate different titles or subheading text accordingly to match these original search terms. Everything else on the page may be the same, but both users would feel like they found exactly what they were looking for. This keeps landing pages hyper-relevant (and high-converting), and saves hours of redundant work.

Want to preview how you can use DTR to ensure relevance from ad to landing page? Try it out.

Google cares about the relevance of landing pages to ads, and has recently introduced more in-depth Quality Score metrics within the AdWords interface.

This makes it easier to see exactly what is affecting your Quality Score and which area you should improve on, whether it be ad relevance, landing page experience or expected CTR.

By syncing up your ads and landing pages, you can provide a frictionless experience to users and increase conversions.

Strong landing pages can also improve PPC performance as they increase Quality Score and landing page relevance, which lowers your CPC and increases ad ranking. This way, the users receive information that is highly relevant to what they are searching for.

Now to put a bow on it

When all is said and done, landing pages should be A/B tested so you know which on-page factors lead to higher conversion rates. That way, your next PPC campaign can be informed by your landing page results, and your future landing pages can be informed by your PPC campaign performance. If that’s not a beautiful full circle, then we don’t know what is.


Unbounce